One Small Dream That Came True

Posted by on Jul 23, 2014 in Blog, Paintings | 11 Comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Email
  • RSS

Matheson Hammock

You’re on a beach, beneath a coconut palm, sipping a cold juice, as you watch the antics of a pudgy naked baby digging in the sand and splashing at the water’s edge. It’s not your baby, but the pureness of the scene delights you at your core.

I was that baby. Frolicking in the buttery waters of a small protected lagoon called Matheson Hammock in Miami. 

That joyful memory burned itself into my psyche, and I always dreamed that one day my own child would be that baby, shrieking with the same delight. But that simple little notion stood frozen for decades, buried beneath the fear that I may never have kids. Until, at age 45, my first lovely son waded through that gentle water, his own dimpled tush covered in sand. I stood a few feet away and teared up silently behind my sunnies.

Dreams need not be epic to be important.

“All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.” T. E. Lawrence.

We all yearn for  the home runs: wealth, creative power, professional ascendance. But, we often brush past the everyday events we hope for … and achieve.

Life is the small stuff stacked into a pile. And that pile becomes our memories. And those memories become our narrative.

It could be as basic as doing down dog with feet finally flat on the ground after 20 years of hamstrings tight as bridge girders (thank you, Day!). Or throwing your conservative upbringing to the wind to get a tattoo. Or cooking an eggplant parm tender enough to cut with a fork. Whatever it is, that quiet victory satisfied you deeply. And that satisfaction is something you should revisit and wallow in a while. “Spend some time wit it, mon,” a Rasta once said to me. Sage advice.

Regal Elephant, acrylic & Chinese funeral paper on paper, 8"x12", Stuart Sheldon

Regal Elephant, acrylic & Chinese funeral paper on paper, 8″x12″, Stuart Sheldon

Walt Disney said, “All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.” Bullshit. Many of our dreams die on the vine. But that’s okay. Many do indeed come true. That is not to say that we should not dream big. Quite the contrary. Go big or go home. But keep those big mama dreams in perspective. Not a day goes by that I don’t wish I was shooting the breeze with Terry Gross about my memoir, A Lonely Fool’s Masterpiece, and the extraordinary odyssey it represents in the life of my wife and me. But, finding an A-list publisher is tough these days. I get it. It’s fine. I’m on it.

Our big dreams will always be there, the mountains we all aim to climb. Hopefully, we all summit.

But think of a tiny dream you’ve achieved recently that really felt good in your gut? Honor that small personal triumph that meant something to you.

Do a little victory dance in the end zone of your heart. Go ahead and spike the ball! Then share it here.

 This post is dedicated to my friend and food artist, Chris L’Hommedieu and his wife Kendra Stanley. Chris died yesterday at 44. But his food and grace personally fulfilled some of my dreams. 

Share and Enjoy

11 Comments

  1. george radell
    July 23, 2014

    seeing both of my great grankids doing so well in all aspects.

    Reply
  2. eric
    July 24, 2014

    walking the dogs with my daughter. it is not a victory so much as an affirmation. my life feels well lived when my adolescent daughter voluntarily joins me in something so mundane.

    Reply
    • Stuart Sheldon
      July 24, 2014

      Amen brother man. Mundane is where the rubber of the heart meets the road of reality

      Reply
  3. andy peay
    July 24, 2014

    seeing people who would otherwise never cross paths greet each other with hearty hugs and belly laughs every July 4th. an easy little gesture i can make to create some positive vibes in the world.

    I will miss you, Chris. Your laugh and sardonic wit gave me and many joy. A life lost but not forgotten.

    Reply
    • Stuart Sheldon
      July 24, 2014

      MASSIVE POSITIVE VIBES, sir. You are a catalyst, Andy Peay. In fact, the last time I kicked it w Chris and a glass of something perfect, was on the lawn at your fine farm. Here’s to the people that set the table for the rest of us!!!!

      Reply
  4. Michelle
    July 24, 2014

    Making time to have a conversation with my 18 year old daughter this morning, at her request. What a thrill that she still wants advice from her mama. Ball spiked. :-)

    Reply
    • Stuart Sheldon
      July 24, 2014

      Score!

      Reply
  5. Inbal
    July 24, 2014

    Thank you Stu,

    A fellow designer in our community passed away on Tuesday at age 38. Just like that – he was gone. He was expecting his first baby girl in just a few weeks and was dearly loved by many of us. I only knew him briefly but the impression he made aligns with the flood of heartfelt words from his closest friends. He was a dreamer and it seems he knew how to build that pile of moments with so many of his friends. This week has been an inspiration and your post echoes the lesson.

    Inbal

    Reply
    • Stuart Sheldon
      July 24, 2014

      Feeling your pain, baby girl!

      Reply
  6. mark Mark Lacy
    July 26, 2014

    Something so profound I read it twice and saved to read again. If you don’t find that A-List publisher, he/she better hope they find you

    Reply
    • Stuart Sheldon
      July 26, 2014

      Thanks Mark. You always make me smile.

      Reply

Leave a Reply